Infrastructure In Latin America And The Caribbean

Author: Marianne Fay
Publisher: World Bank Publications
ISBN: 9780821366776
Size: 17.50 MB
Format: PDF
View: 63

This book reviews Latin America's experience with infrastructure reform over the last fifteen years. It argues that the region's infrastructure has suffered from public retrenchment and unrealistic expectations about private involvement. Poor infrastructure now hampers productivity, growth, and poverty reduction. Addressing this requires more and better spending, and acceptance that governments remain central to infrastructure provision and supervision, although the private sector still has an important role to play.

Ana S Story

Author: Jenna Bush Hager
Publisher: Harper Collins
ISBN: 0061756164
Size: 15.82 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 13

Ana's life is a collection of bits and pieces of her past. Infected with HIV at birth, she's unaware of many details of her early childhood and barely remembers her mother. Living with her strict grandmother, she learns how to keep secrets – secrets about her infection and about the abuse she endures at home. But after Ana falls in love and becomes pregnant at seventeen, she begins a journey of hope – a journey of protecting herself and others. She is living with HIV, not dying from it. Jenna Bush tells of Ana's struggle to break free from the cycle of abuse, silence, and illness with passion and eloquence. But this is not just Ana's story. It is also the story of many children around the world who are marginalized, neglected, and mistreated.

Latin America S Cold War

Author: Hal Brands
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674058439
Size: 13.55 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 84

For Latin America, the Cold War was anything but cold. Nor was it the so-called “long peace” afforded the world’s superpowers by their nuclear standoff. In this book, the first to take an international perspective on the postwar decades in the region, Hal Brands sets out to explain what exactly happened in Latin America during the Cold War, and why it was so traumatic.

The Government And Politics Of The Middle East And North Africa

Author: Mark Gasiorowski
Publisher: Hachette UK
ISBN: 9780813350363
Size: 18.76 MB
Format: PDF, Mobi
View: 45

With recent upheavals in the Middle East and North Africa, the eighth edition of The Government and Politics of the Middle East and North Africa has been thoroughly revised to provide a necessary, comprehensive and current examination of the domestic politics and foreign policies of this crucial region. A newly expanded introduction provides students with a comparative and thematic overview of the region, from its political regimes and electoral institutions to its economic and social concerns. Each chapter, written by an invited specialist, uses a common framework to explore the historical background, social and political environment, political structure and dynamics, and foreign policy of a country. Chapters are augmented by a country map, a box providing key facts, and an annotated bibliography summarizing the major literature. The eighth edition provides vital new considerations of the aftermath of the Arab Spring, the ongoing sectarian violence and rise of ISIS, and the growth of social forces like youth movements and women's rights groups. In addition, the inclusion of six new contributors brings fresh perspectives, ensuring that The Government and Politics of the Middle East and North Africa remains an essential guide to the region's political landscape.

Mapping Latin America

Author: Jordana Dym
Publisher: University of Chicago Press
ISBN: 9780226921815
Size: 16.59 MB
Format: PDF, Docs
View: 53

For many, a map is nothing more than a tool used to determine the location or distribution of something—a country, a city, or a natural resource. But maps reveal much more: to really read a map means to examine what it shows and what it doesn’t, and to ask who made it, why, and for whom. The contributors to this new volume ask these sorts of questions about maps of Latin America, and in doing so illuminate the ways cartography has helped to shape this region from the Rio Grande to Patagonia. In Mapping Latin America,Jordana Dym and Karl Offen bring together scholars from a wide range of disciplines to examine and interpret more than five centuries of Latin American maps.Individual chapters take on maps of every size and scale and from a wide variety of mapmakers—from the hand-drawn maps of Native Americans, to those by famed explorers such as Alexander von Humboldt, to those produced in today’s newspapers and magazines for the general public. The maps collected here, and the interpretations that accompany them, provide an excellent source to help readers better understand how Latin American countries, regions, provinces, and municipalities came to be defined, measured, organized, occupied, settled, disputed, and understood—that is, how they came to have specific meanings to specific people at specific moments in time. The first book to deal with the broad sweep of mapping activities across Latin America, this lavishly illustrated volume will be required reading for students and scholars of geography and Latin American history, and anyone interested in understanding the significance of maps in human cultures and societies.